Thursday, October 11, 2007

The Uncomplicated Life

America can't be beat when it comes to milk and ice cream and steaks. While we trained in Brooklyn back in those days when there were no limits to work hours and we would have to draw the blood from patients with full-blown AIDS ourselves and we'd get to go home after 48 straight hours, we'd pass by the corner grocery store and buy some rib eye which we would toss into a pyrex dish with soy sauce and lemon juice. As the meat soaked in the marinade, we'd put the rice cooker into action. After showering we'd sprinkle garlic on top of the steaks and then broil it for 3 minutes, just enough time to sear both sides. We lived on this diet for many years. Occasionally, we would have a salad and some fried eggs with our meal but the fundamental dish remained.

Now that I am alone once again, and I have to do my own laundry and iron my clothes and clean the house, after clinic, I would play a few holes of golf in our municipal course and return to my ultimate comfort food. Life is so uncomplicated here.


13 comments:

tgkl said...

Thats a lot of steak for being alone!

Martin D. Bautista, M.D. said...

Oh no, 4 hungry golfers partook of the feast.

Anonymous said...

dr. atkins would be proud (except for the rice)

rglacsamana, m.d. said...

Ah, the good life!

What could be better than living in two worlds and still practice your trade abroad? And have all that good steak?

Another election is coming up next year. Has the good Doc decided on whether he will run again? One way or another, I suppose he will have to decide on whether to stay there or come back here. He should be known to most Pinoy voters by now.

Martin D. Bautista, M.D. said...

Dear Doc RG, the elections that will matter will be in 2010. That's where we will participate.

USAMDLAWS - Beta Sigma said...

Dr. Bautista,

On your recent blogs it appears that you are back in the U.S. practicing Gastroenterology. This is after the fact that you ran for senate in our country the Philippines. I have to ask how are you able to do it?
You are either an American Citizen, a Filipino Citizen, Immigrant or Dual Citizenship. If you are currently a:

1) American Citizen: Hence you are able to practice in the U.S. However, did you not sign a form relinquishing your Citizenship when you ran for Senate? If you did, You are in breech of that form in the Philippines. Also, by U.S. law , while being a citizen of the U.S. you are NOT allowed to participate in another country politics (evidence of running for office) and therefore grounds for removal of your citizenship.

2) Filipino Citizen - then you should not be allowed to practice in the U.S. this is also against the U.S. laws.

3) Immigrant - same as number one.

4) Dual Citizen -U.S. and/or Philippine Law does not grant you to be part of Philippine politics. Same scenario as number one since the U.S. will not allow its citizen to be part of another country's politics (even just by running for senate - does not have to win).

Please answer the above. I will then forward your response to the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services as well as the Philippine consulate.

Martin D. Bautista, M.D. said...

beta sigma, I am a Filipino citizen. I never renounced my citizenship even if I could have conveniently done that a long, long time ago. I am practicing gastroenterology here in the US because I wish to be completely independent from all the political bullshit in our country where politicians make a living from politics while the majority of our people receive substandard education and protein-poor diets. I wish that you will free yourself from the mentality that only traditional politicians can participate in Philippine politics. Remember: it is my country too and I have no intentions of defaulting on my obligations to all these trapos who have nothing to show for all the years of their monopoly towards the formulation of public policy. I am returning next week and I would be happy to meet with you in person. Tama na itong takot nating makibahagi sa pamahalaan ng ating bayan. Please feel free to forward this reply to whatever agencies you deem appropriate.

Anonymous said...

good day Doc. are you back in the US? andre calizo

Beta Sigma said...

I'll ask my father to talk to you when you go back to the Philippines. For now God Bless.

Anonymous said...

...Dr. Martin....fighting for a cause is not an easy task, esp. if yours is helping the Philippine poor, who by their poverty and ignorance are the food of the entrenced politicos. All the well meaning leaders of history have led sacrificed lives. The other side are many and ruthless. You gotta be pretty cool in your reading of situations and people...Sigma Beta could be a paid mercenary, a sincere citizen or a possible friend....

Chinachix said...

hi,

i just discovered your blog and am going through your previous posts. as someone who is open to the idea of moving back to pinas (going "upstream", as you have previously noted), reading your own balikbayan experience makes for great dinnertime debate between me and the hubby (who says nay to returning, unless he can golf 24/7 back home :).

i am little confused though...are you back in guymon?

Martin D. Bautista, M.D. said...

chinachix, I will be in Guymon until Sunday (Oct 21) when I go back home. when I am in Bacolod, I play up to 36 holes of golf each day and seeing that you are a spaholic, you can get a 2 hour rejuvenating massage for $5.

Grant Mallard said...

Dr. Bautista

I am glad I found your blog and I wish you all the best!